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"Let's say we get CS:GO keys for Rs. 100 from traders on Reddit, and we also buy CS:GO gun skins from Reddit for around 80 percent of the market price," he divulged. "What happens next is we sell these keys on Steam's Community Marketplace for Rs. 160 each. After Steam deducts its fees of Rs. 24 (15 percent of the transaction), we get Rs. 136. Essentially, we can get Rs. 136 of Steam wallet funds for Rs. 100." The CS GO keys and guns are both in-game items that are highly sought after. In fact, some feel that a part of the reason for Counter-Strike: Global Offensive's ongoing popularity is the ability to customise your guns with different cosmetic skins. As you play you'll end up obtaining a few and you can use keys to unlock more. The rarer the skin, the more sought after it is by the game's rabid community.Introducing tons of new weapons was off the table too, since this could unbalance the game and ward players away. Plus, players tend to stick to a small handful of weapons that they like, so new weapons wouldn't be all that popular.

I was kinda skeptical about that and even to this day, I don't think that's going to be the case. But they were really adamant about making TI a free-to-play game, so I didn't have much of a choice. I had to try and redesign the game to allow for it to exist in a free-to-play space.

The CS: GO community has benefited greatly from this microtransaction-oriented addition to the game. Today, CS: GO stands as one of the most popular games in the world with a consistent 500,000+ concurrent player count, and it's due in large part to the introduction of these skins. With this incredible amount of popularity, tournament are held regularly and with increasing prize pools, and so has the game's attractiveness for sponsors. There's a community centered around CS: GO, eSport matches, skins, and more that surpasses anything that the franchise has ever achieved before. As the game has built up a massive market, dedicated players have been able to make a good living playing the game as professional gamers, managers, shoutcasters, and streamers.

Fundamental parts of Counter-Strike are opaque. Which surfaces can and can’t be penetrated, and by which weapons? How do flashes work? Can a player that loses the first two rounds of a match afford an AWP? You have to be willing to do some homework and take in raw facts about the game, information that drives deeper realizations about how it can be playedWith CES just past, there’s a move in the market to introduce new computer hardware through Q1 and Q2, making for a prime buying time of existing stock.There's also an argument to be made that since Valve is making a killing off these cases, it naturally feels incentivized to devote more resources to post-release development of the game. During the past year the game has seen the addition of a new weapon, hitboxes, culling, animations, and more. This support has made the game better, and is part of the reason why the game is so big it can challenge Dota 2's concurrent player count.

Team Fortress 2 and Day of Defeat: Source are both less played and less competitive, and would probably not be as responsive to being pushed towards eSports than CS:GO, so why they’re letting one of their biggest money makers just sit there is a weird thing to me. Then again, I don’t think Valve has thought about Day of Defeat: Source since 2006.This makes them viable targets to begin with. But now, games such as CounterStrike: Global Offensive (CS:GO) have grown into an actual business. They offer various ‘skins’ for weapons within the game that are purely aesthetic but nonetheless desired. There are hundreds of variations, and Valve adds a minimum of twenty of them every other month.With it’s Steam release hitting just recently, Clannad really got it’s fifteen minutes of fame. With all of the purchases, the visual novel found itself in the Top Sellers list on Steam, beating out Call of Duty: Black Ops III and Grand Theft Auto V, though it failed to pass CS:GO and Fallout 4.CS: GO wouldn't experience a very successful launch. Priced at $14.99 it sold more than a million units within one week, but wasn't able to retain a high activity average among its playerbase. Within a couple months most players would transition to Call of Duty: Black Ops 2, Halo 4, or even return to CS 1.6 or Battlefield 3 for their shooter fix, resulting in a sub-50,000 concurrent player count for what Valve hoped would be its premier FPS for the next decade.The three patches released so far claim to address such issues, but, despite a general improvement bad things keep happening. In some cases it's gotten worse. In ranked matchmaking when you do eventually get into a game, one team often hopelessly outclasses the other. Bizarrely, the casual playlist produces much more balanced matches. A lot of my ranked games are 4-0 defeats or victories, and when you look at the ranks afterwards it's obvious why: one team has some bronze and silver players, and the other platinum. It is mind-boggling for a game of this quality to have such problems.We could let Siege damn itself, in fact, by noting some of the things that have been fixed. Patch 1.1 changed the nearly-unforgivable launch netcode that meant you were regularly killed by people that hadn't yet appeared on-screen, as well as the charmless issue of random players' microphones permanently transmitting during matches. Patch 1.2 introduced the ability to let you manually change the data centre you're connecting to by editing the gamesettings.ini file (very PC gamer). The developers justified this as the quickest way to get a fix out there for a common problem before adding it in-game. That's fine, but it does bring to mind a mechanic hanging off the front of an F1 car.

The new detection abilities of VAC means more than 16 cheat-selling sites can be detected, and anyone caught using their hacks and the like risks being kicked, banned and losing everything.The Score reports that the 2015 Cologne tournament will see 16 teams battling for $250,000 in prize money, which will be funded entirely by the ESL. Last year's Cologne tournament offered a similar prize pool but was "community funded" through sales of the 2013 Arms Deal update. Ulrich Schulze, the ESL's managing director of pro gaming, said the ESL-exclusive funding demonstrates its commitment to CS:GO as a professional e-sport.

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